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(Not technical)

    I have always said that emotional part of our lives is of extreme importance and I am absolutely convinced that the way we feel about things influences the reality around us. However questionable the statement might be (go ahead, call me a nut!) you must agree that our mood does condition the way we work.

    It is quite simple, every action is as good as its motivation. A motivated worker is an efficient worker. Whenever the motivation level drops, so does the performance, attention, learning ability and everything else.

     Don't know about you, but I sometimes get those days when I go to work and feel like a million dollars. The workshop seems the best place to be, everything is crystal clear and the best thing about it is that I know exactly what I need to do. Everything gets planned and sticks to the plan. Love those days. The best feeling is the feeling of my head working at 200%! Things run smooth, fast, and in a super-cool fashion.

     But sometimes, fortunately rare times in my case, everything just starts to go f@cking wrong with no apparent reason... So I came up with a theory which, I think, have proved right so far, and it goes like this: "I do not get upset because something is not going right, but rather everything is going wrong because I am upset about something". Last time (today) I came to my shop with a problem stuffed head (I know you have them problems too) I tipped over the torch oxygen bottle and busted the entire pressure reducer assembly in an unbelievably crooked fashion. The funniest thing is that I still do not fully understand how it was physically possible to go down the way it did...

      The point of all this is to consider the importance of the emotional atmosphere in a workshop environment. If you own a workshop, you might think of improving some things just to make the "guys" feel better, with the benefit  of an improved productivity, and whenever you see someone with a "problem" face, you might talk to the person to see what is wrong or at least make an effort to cheer him up. A distracted soldier is a dead soldier. A distracted oil-hydraulics technician ends up dismounting a 60-liter accumulator pre-charged to a 100 bar with 30 liters of oil inside without discharging it first...

    If you are a "hands-on worker", you might consider keeping a positive state of mind as your permanent "work mode". Believe me, you will only benefit from it.

    What I see in many workshops I visit, is people complaining about needs they have, and yet doing nothing  to satisfy them. This state of mind is a hundred percent loser's path, and something you should avoid at all costs. If you are not satisfied with the current state of things, like your position, your salary, you name it, instead of complaining and feeling sorrowful about yourself, change the state of mind to "happy" and GET BETTER in what you are doing. Everything else will come by itself. Hydraulics offers one billion opportunities to anyone at all levels. All you need to do is to chin up and START DOING instead of planning stuff and sitting on your ass.

    I consider myself a lucky man - I like what I do for living...